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Wheat Field with Crows by Van Gogh, c 1890
 

Art Springs Eternal!

March Newsletter

 

Dear Koren,   

  
Spring Bouquet by Renoir c1866
We actually said goodbye to the warmest winter on record for Southern California some time ago in truth; but now spring is really upon us along with all that brings.
  
And while it can be hard at times to remember it should be spring with the heat and drought and brown all about, art is forever springing eternal; especially here in Los Angeles!
 
So be sure to take some time this March to visit one of LA's amazing museums, galleries or art walks and stop to smell the paint and let the colors of spring grow in your spirit.
 
There are a number of new exhibit openings this spring, and much more on the way next month. Our March newsletter brings you a peek at just a few of them, so be sure to check out what is in store below and at the museum websites. We also touch again on some Art Theory with a short discussion of Color Theory in art and framing, as well as bringing you a sampling of Art World News from our blog.
 
And, don't forget to go check out the full blog for anything you may have missed form previous months. Newsletters only happen once a month, but our art blog can keep you up to date on the newest news, information, gallery and museum events as well as help educate and enlighten you on everything about art, design, and framing. So, drop over and see what we have happening at the FrameStore Blog today!
  
Spring has sprung at last, and even as our record breaking winter fades in our memories, our eyes turn towards the summer and the new year ahead, and FrameStore wants to help you make your memories from every season last forever!
  
***    ***    ***
 
FrameStore has been helping southern Californians take care of their photos, artwork, and mementos correctly for over 40 years.

Stop by one of our stores this week to have one of our Art and Design experts help you to turn those precious memories that will only come once into lasting and lovely art that will bring joy for decades.

Visit our website at www.customframestore.com for locations and contact information!

 

From Our Blog:

 

 

Hammer Museum Now Free to the Public  

 

Beginning February 9, the Hammer Museum eliminated its admission fee and became entirely FREE to the public!

Free admission coincided with the opening of the Hammer's new exhibition Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology
.

 

Read the rest of the article at our Blog, here:

 

http://blog.customframestore.com/hammer-museum-now-free-to-the-public/

  

 

11 of the Most Unforgettable Art Heists in History 

 

Through out the course of history, nothing has attracted the attention of criminals, and the occasional, not so criminal, quite like fine art and priceless relics.Here is a short list of some of history's most memorable art thefts and recoveries.

 

Read the rest of the article at our Blog, here:

 

http://blog.customframestore.com/famous-art-heists/

 

 

 

Getty Center to Exhibit Jackson Pollock's Newly Restored Painting, "Mural" 

 

A After more than 19 months of daunting restoration and researching efforts, Jackson Pollock's epic painting "Mural" will be on display starting in March at The Getty Center.

 

The Getty's researchers have been repairing effects of earlier preservation work on the massive 8-by-20-foot painting, while exploring the artist's radical technique and materials, using X-rays, scanning electron microscopy and mass spectrometers to probe the $140 million painting.

 

Read the rest of the article at our Blog, here:

 

http://blog.customframestore.com/getty-center-exhibit-jackson-pollocks-newly-restored-painting-mural/

 

 

Top Ten List - 2013 A Record Breaking Year For Art Auction Sales 

 

Bloomberg has released the list of the top auction sales in 2013, which includes the 59.6 carat pink diamond the Pink Star, sold at Sotheby's in Geneva on November 13 for $83 million. It's pretty remarkable that a diamond was the third most expensive sale of the year in any category.Let's check out the top 10 art auction sales of the year, shall we?

 

The top 10 auction lots of 2013 raised $752.2 million, a 27 percent increase from 2012 and an 82 percent jump from 2011, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Every item in the group fetched more than $45 million. In November, Christie's International sold $692 million of art in less than three hours, the highest auction tally ever.

 

Read the rest of the article at our Blog, here:

 

http://blog.customframestore.com/2013-a-record-breaking-year-for-art-auction-sales/ 

 

 

SoCal Art Happenings -

 

LACMA:

  Yellow Dumpster (Yellow with blue swoosh) by Kaz Oshiro c2010      

Kaz Oshiro:

Chasing Ghosts

 
January 24, 2014 - June 7, 2014

  

As part of the museum's ongoing engagement with the community, LACMA presents an exhibition of work by Kaz Oshiro at the museum's satellite gallery within Charles White Elementary School. The exhibition juxtaposes objects Oshiro selected from the museum's collection, new work based on his interactions at the school, and student art. Oshiro is best known for creating high fidelity sculptures of everyday objects-microwaves, dumpsters, file cabinets. By using the materials of painting (paint, canvas, stretcher bars) to fabricate sculpture, Oshiro's work transcends tromp l'oeil trickery and blurs the distinction between the two media. Oshiro was born in Okinawa, Japan and is based in Los Angeles.

Charles White Elementary School opened in 2004 on the former campus of Otis College of Art and Design. The school is named for local artist Charles White (1918-1979), who taught at Otis for many years. LACMA has been programming exhibitions at the school since 2007.

Public Hours: Open from 12 pm-4:30 pm February 8, March 8, April 6, April 12, May 10, June 7, 2014. Enter the gallery at the corner of Park View and Wilshire Boulevard.

 

 

 

The Jugglers (Detail) by David Hockney  

 

David Hockney:

The Jugglers

 
February 1, 2014 - April 20, 2014

Considered one of the most innovative artists of the postwar era, British-born David Hockney (b. 1937) has, throughout his career in Los Angeles and England, adopted various new media in order to investigate perception. Embracing cutting-edge technology including Polaroids, iPad and iPhone drawings, and, most recently film, Hockney explores new ways to depict movement through multiple perspectives on a singular event. In The Jugglers, June 24th 2012, Hockney uses eighteen fixed cameras to record a procession of jugglers as John Philip Sousa's "The Stars and Stripes Forever" plays in the background. Displayed on a multiscreen grid, Hockney says the film "forces the eye to scan, and it is impossible to see everything at once. It gives back the choice to the viewer, and hence brings about possibilities for new narratives."

LACMA has long championed Hockney's work, with over 150 paintings, drawings, and works on paper in the museum's collection. LACMA also organized David Hockney: A Retrospective (1988), and hosted David Hockney: A Drawing Retrospective (1996) and David Hockney Portraits (2006).
 

 

If you visit these exhibitions, be sure to leave us your thoughts and impressions on our blog over at :

 


 

Santa Monica Museum of Art:

 

        

 

Keltie Ferris:

Doomsday Boogie

 

January 18, 2014 - April 5, 2014

 

Keltie Ferris is a New York-based artist who, armed with a spray paint of vaporized oil pigments, has developed a fresh and entirely original abstract language. Doomsday Boogie includes several of Ferris's large-scale paintings, along with a series of thin vertical paintings-physical realizations of the zips that originated in Barnett Newman's abstract expressionist work. The larger paintings, with their pixelated backgrounds and neon, atmospheric foregrounds, evoke technological cityscapes. They have all the layered space and temporality of Tron, City of Night, and masterpieces of sci fi-noir. The paintings measure up to nine feet and juxtapose earthy blacks, greens, purples, and browns with vivid, chemical shots of gold, red, pink, acid green, and chartreuse. To achieve her desired effects, Ferris overlays hand painted geometric grounds with her signature, graffiti-like markings in spray paint. In select pieces she also outlines the fields of spray in abrupt, vertical strokes of color.

Keltie Ferris: Doomsday Boogie is organized by Jeffrey Uslip, curator-at-large for the Santa Monica Museum of Art.

About the artist:
Keltie Ferris was born in Kentucky in 1977 and lives and works in Brooklyn. She received her MFA in 2006 from Yale University in New Haven, CT and her BFA in 2004 from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD). Her solo show Maneaters was on view at the Kemper Museum, Kansas City, MO in 2009. In addition, her paintings have been included in group exhibitions at institutions around the country, including The Kitchen, New York; The Addison Gallery, Andover, MA; the Nerman Museum, Overland Park, KS; and the Indianapolis Museum of Art in Indiana; in addition to galleries in the U.S. and abroad. She is the recipient of both a Jacob Javits Fellowship and a Rema Hort Mann Foundation Grant.

About the curator:
Jeffrey Uslip was born in 1977 and lives and works in New York City. At SMMoA, he most recently organized Michael Queenland: Rudy's Ramp of Remainders; Agnes Denes: Body Prints, Philosophical Drawings, and Map Projections, 1969 - 1978; Samira Yamin: We Will Not Fail; and Joyce Pensato: I KILLED KENNY. Uslip has also organized exhibitions for PS1/MoMA, New York; Artists Space, New York; Columbia University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles; and LA><ART, Los Angeles. He has lectured at the Yale University School of Art, New Haven, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and is an online contributor to Artforum. Uslip is currently a PhD candidate at The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

This exhibition has been made possible by SMMoA's Ambassador Circle. Support has also been provided by the City of Santa Monica and the Santa Monica Arts Commission and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.

Indigo for Sylvestor by Xylor Jane c2011

Xylor Jane:

Sea Legs

 

January 18, 2014 - April 5, 2014

 

Sea Legs includes a series of recent paintings by Xylor Jane, a a Massachusetts-based artist whose paintings are made up of regimented numerical patterns and spectrums of color. The paintings in Sea Legs look like vibrant abstractions but are in fact made up of thousands of dots, methodically applied according to complex numerical systems. Jane regularly uses palindromes and prime numbers in her paintings, along with the Fibonacci sequence-the golden ratio used by Mother Nature and financial analysts alike. She also employs the Julian date system, a calendaring sequence that has assigned a unique decimal to each day since January 1, 4713 BC. Through compulsive patterning, Jane subverts and queers logical systems as a means of ordering the universe. Her signature use of the ROYGBIV color scale riffs off of the gay pride flag, but insists on the inclusion of indigo-presenting a challenge to the commodification of LGBTQIO symbols and broader normative systems.

At its core, Xylor Jane's work is embedded in human experience. One recent painting lists the full moons of her life by Julian day number, and another is a hauntingly precise numerological translation of a near death experience. Rather than existing as industrialized abstractions, her paintings approach the spiritual and even the sublime. The Santa Monica Museum of Art is pleased to highlight her recent work and present her heavily-coded canvases in the context of Southern California's Silicon Beach.

Xylor Jane: Sea Legs is organized by Jeffrey Uslip, curator-at-large for the Santa Monica Museum of Art.

About the artist:
Xylor Jane was born in California in 1963 and lives and works in Greenfield, Massachusetts. She received her BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1993. Her paintings have been included in group exhibitions at institutions and galleries around the world, including the Boston University Art Gallery; Galerie Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels; International Art Objects, Los Angeles; The Garage, Moscow; Deitch Projects, New York; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. She has had solo shows in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, and Dublin.

About the curator:
Jeffrey Uslip was born in 1977 and lives and works in New York City. At SMMoA, he most recently organized Michael Queenland: Rudy's Ramp of Remainders; Agnes Denes: Body Prints, Philosophical Drawings, and Map Projections, 1969 - 1978; Samira Yamin: We Will Not Fail; and Joyce Pensato: I KILLED KENNY. Uslip has also organized exhibitions for PS1/MoMA, New York; Artists Space, New York; Columbia University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles; and LA><ART, Los Angeles. He has lectured at the Yale University School of Art, New Haven, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and is an online contributor to Artforum. Uslip is currently a PhD candidate at The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

This exhibition has been made possible by SMMoA's Ambassador Circle. Support has also been provided by the City of Santa Monica and the Santa Monica Arts Commission and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.
 

 

In the Studio -

 

In the Studio:  

  

  The Color Wheel

 

Art Education

Custom-Framing Essentials:  

Color Theory in Art

  
I - Introduction
  
For a long time, now, there has been a problem that fledgling designers have run into on a constant basis. This problem seems insignificant to most, but in actuality it is quite possibly the most important factor in a design or piece of artwork. Yes, you guessed it...I'm talking about the issue of COLOR.

Color can be a touchy subject. Sometimes artists use colors that evoke certain emotions. Other times artists use colors simply because they like the way they look. While any design instructor will tell you that the latter reason is completely wrong, I tend to disagree. In my personal opinion, color always has meaning. This meaning can be, as I mentioned, an emotional one or it can be a personal preference on the part of the artist himself, but it ALWAYS has purpose behind it.

There is nothing wrong with choosing a color because you like it because, after all, it is your work. However, when choosing a color you still want to make sure its use does not conflict with what you are trying to say with your work. Proper use of basic color theory can help you decide what colors match, as well as what each color makes people feel.
  
  
II - The Wheel
  
The color wheel has earned a place in the hearts of many artists and designers across the globe. Not because its the perfect tool, but because everybody, at some point, has had to make one of their own as part of a ridiculous art class project.

The wheel's construction is actually quite simple. You have your 6 basic colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. Then, depending on which wheel you're looking at, you have extra, "in-between" colors that are mixes of the basic colors.

There are names for all of these colors, which are important to know. The following is a list of all of the names of colors and what they're good for.

Primary Colors: Red, Yellow, Blue. These 3 colors are the base colors for every other color on the color wheel. This is why they're called "primary." When you mix two primaries together, you get a secondary color.

Also note the triangular positioning of the primary colors on the color wheel, and how the secondary colors are next to them.
Primary colors are useful for designs or art that needs to have a sense of urgency. Primary colors are the most vivid colors when placed next to each other, which is why you'll notice that most fast food joints use primary colors in their logos, as it evokes speed.

Secondary Colors: Orange, Green, Purple. These 3 colors are what you get when you mix the primary colors together.
They're located in-between the primary colors to indicate what colors they're made from. Notice how green is in-between yellow and blue.
Secondary colors are usually more interesting than primary colors, but they do not evoke speed and urgency.

Tertiary Colors: These are those "in-between" colors like Yellow-Green and Red-Violet. They're made by mixing one primary color and one secondary color together. There can be endless combinations of tertiary colors, depending on how they're mixed.

Complementary Colors: Red and Green, Blue and Orange, Purple and Yellow. These are the colors directly across from eachother on the color wheel. Don't let the name fool you, they rarely look good when used together. They're called "complementary" because, when used together, they become extremely vibrant and have heavy contrast.

Complementary colors are useful when you want to make something stand out. For example, if you use a green background and have a red circle on it, the red will jump off the page and be almost blinding.

Analogous Colors: Red and Orange, Blue and Green, etc. These are colors right next to each other on the color wheel. They usually match extremely well, but they also create almost no contrast. They're good for very serene-feeling designs and artwork where you want viewers to feel comfortable.
  
  
III - Other Terms
  
There are plenty of other names and titles that refer to different aspects of color, but this is where it starts getting complex. If you want to know more about color, read on.

Warm Colors: Colors such as red, yellow, and orange. These colors evoke warmth because they remind us of things like the sun or fire.

Cool Colors: Colors like blue, green, and purple (violet). These colors evoke a cool feeling because they remind us of things like water or grass.

Neutral Colors: Gray, Brown. These aren't on most color wheels, but they're considered neutral because they don't contrast with much of anything. They're dull and uneventful.

Value: Usually refers to the amount of black in a color. The more black a color has, the darker its value.

Brightness: Refers to the amount of white in a color. The more white a color has, the brighter it is.

Saturation: Refers to the amount of a color used. When a color is at full saturation, it is extremely vibrant. When a color is "desaturated," a large amount of color has been removed. Desaturated colors tend to be close to being neutral because there is so much gray in them.
  
  
IV - Types of Color
  
As you might suspect, there are different types of color. Now is when you can throw the color wheel out the window.

RGB Color: This is color based upon light. Your computer monitor and television use RGB. The name "RGB" stands for Red, Green, Blue, which are the 3 primaries (with green replacing yellow). By combining these 3 colors, any other color can be produced. Remember, this color method is only used with light sources; it does not apply to printing.

CMYK Color: This is the color method based upon pigments. "CMYK" stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black (its what the K stands for). Using these 4 colors, most other colors can be achieved. 
 
Unfortunately, CMYK cannot reproduce the same amount of colors as RGB can, which is why yellow-greens sometimes look a bit muddy when printed.

This is the method used by printers the world over, and is also a clever way of mixing paints.

Pantone (PMS) Color: This is yet another printing color method. PMS stands for "Pantone Matching System," and is a large list of specially mixed colors made by the Pantone Corporation. Instead of using CMYK to create colors, the pigments are created individually for purity.

For example, if I wanted to use a Red-Violet color, I'd pick PMS 233M. The color would be made exclusively for my project and would always print exactly how I want.
The only drawback to using PMS colors is that they're only useful for projects with few colors. They're also expensive.
  
  
©2007 Ryan Ford. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

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We here at FrameStore hope that your spring will be filled with love, art, family, and many memories with lots, and lots of lively colour!

Sincerely,

Chuck Mitchell
FrameStore
March News
From Our Blog: Art World News
Art Happenings - LACMA
Art Happenings - Santa Monica Museum of Art
In the Studio: Art Education - Color Theory
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